Monday, October 24, 2011

Misleading Trailer for Paranormal Activity 3

We’ve all seen the Trailers for the Paranormal Activity movies, but oddly enough the viewers were disappointed to find that the scenes from the trailer didn’t make it on to the big screen. The scene of the two girls playing Bloody Mary in the bathroom was on one of the first trailers that came out for this movie, but it wasn’t on the screen. This happened with four other scenes that were in the trailers, but did not seem to make it to the final cuts of the film. So why did the director put these scenes from the film on the trailer only to lead to disappointment for the fans. Even though I do not watch scary movies, those 5 scenes that didn’t make it to the big screen, but made it to the trailer of the movie, made me want to go watch the movie. Did the director feel that he needed to do this as an incentive for the film or was it because the director sent out the trailers before he ACTUALLY decided his final cut? Either way, he led fans into disappointment because they were left pondering on what led up to those scenes and what those scenes led up to.

4 comments:

Lauren said...

I think that leading an audiance on with trailors to get them to watch their movie is very unfair. In fact if they make more movies people may be hesitant to watch the next one because it is possible it won't be what people expected or as good as the trailor made it seem, potentially harming their fans demand to watch their movies.

chris cole said...

I agree this seems like this is a big problem in a lot of movies. I know i've seen a couple movie trailers that look hilarious, yet those scenes aren't in the movie. This does, in fact, seem like some type of incentive strategy the directors/producers/advertisers use to get people to be interested in their movies. Even though it does happen, i feel like most movies still make a generally solid revenue, if it's a good movie.

RidaB said...

Thanks for the comments(:

Nicole K said...

I specifically remember the Bloody Mary scene from the previews too, and I remember that it was the part that I would refer to when telling people that I wanted to see that movie because it looked so good. And I completely agree that it was a huge disappointment when it wasn’t in the actual movie, but strangely enough I actually liked what the movie did with that scene more than the preview. I kept waiting to see that scene, was disappointed with not seeing the ghost, but was pleasantly surprised with what it was replaced with. This is confusing to me and kind of debates your incentive theory. Maybe it was just for time purposes or something, but I don’t know if it was truly for a positive incentive to see that movie. Maybe it was just my opinion though.

Nicole K